Autumn’s grab bag of web resources

I am just back from a fast and fun workshop on Cape Cod. The Autumn weather was great for photographing. The many subjects we photographed (beaches at sunrise, cranberry harvesting, etc.) were fascinating. I am about to head off to New York City for the big Photo Plus Expo, the annual trade show “for professionals and advanced amateurs in the photographic and imaging industries.” I expect to leave that show with lots of info to share. Today’s blog is another grab bag of similar information I have been gathering that I hope you find worthwhile.

At last year’s Photo Plus Expo, I visited the booth for SocialDocumentary.net. As they say, it is “a website for photographers, NGOs, editors, journalists, lovers of photography and anyone else who believes that photography plays an important role in educating people about our world. “ It struck me as a good idea, but I was wondering if it would survive in the current “difficult” economy. They seem to have survived and thrived. You can read more about them at: http://www.socialdocumentary.net/competition.php You can see my entry in their current competition, documenting the global recession at: http://www.socialdocumentary.net/exhibit/David_Wells/561

Some friends of mine are similarly using a website to promote awareness and social change. Go to http://www.faces4reform.com/ to see their project called “Faces 4 Reform.” They are making portraits of Americans without health insurance, “in response to the current health care debate…to put a human face on this politically polarized issue.” There is also a nice article about their site at: http://www.livebooks.com/community/sitesoftheweek/2009/09/w5/robbie_robert_bailey.php

I am thrilled to be able to direct you to a site to see the work of the students in my street photography class that was held at the Maine Media Workshops this past August. At the end of each week of classes at MMW, the workshop community gathers on Friday night to share their work from the week. The Friday night slide show from my class can now be seen at: http://www.theworkshops.com/workshops/galleries/street-photography/2009-08-23

Another group that I suspected might not be in business today are the folks at www.the-impossible-project.com Their goal was to re-start production of analog instant film for vintage Polaroid cameras in 2010. They just announced “…history making cooperation between Polaroid and The Impossible Project where the Polaroid licensee – The Summit Global Group – will re-launch some of the most famous Polaroid Instant Cameras. They are commissioning The Impossible Project to develop and produce a limited edition of Polaroid branded Instant Films in the middle of 2010.” The project’s mission “is NOT to re-build Polaroid Integral film but (with the help of strategic partners) to develop a new product with new characteristics, consisting of new optimised components, produced with a streamlined modern setup. An innovative and fresh analog material, sold under a new brand name that perfectly will match the global re-positioning of Integral Films.” I wish them nothing but good luck.

Today, in so many different parts of photography, what was, is no more. But what will be born out of the “creative destruction’ that the industry is under going, will inevitably stimulate all sorts of new experimentation and images. And isn’t that what it is really all about?

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